Inspiring Talks at the 2016 Silicon Valley Prayer Breakfast — Videos Now Available

The sold-out gathering of the 2016 Silicon Valley Prayer Breakfast on April 1 had the privilege to hear moving testimonies by outstanding speakers.

The event was kicked-off by an inspiring talk by Deloitte executive Connie Segreto. In her message titled “God is only a Whisper Away,” Connie shared a heart-felt message of how God helped her through painful experiences. “God is always near,” she said “no matter where we find ourselves. When we turn to Him, He is ready to answer. I believe that there are some wounds that only God can heal, that there some holes in our heart that only God can fill, and that there are some challenges that only God can walk us through.” God helped Connie get through her pain by giving her the gift of forgiveness and the opportunity to help other women who suffer from abuse.

You can view her talk here:

Following Connie’s talk, the crowd heard a brief interview with Skip Vaccarello, author of this site and the book Finding God in Silicon Valley. In the interview, Skip shared surprises he discovered in the research for his book.

 

 

The event also featured the 2015 keynote speaker and Google executive, Kirk Perry. At the conclusion of his talk at last year’s event, Kirk shared how he had recently been diagnosed with cancer. In his talk at this year’s event, Kirk discussed his roller coaster ride through the disease and how he experienced transformation through the process.

 

The keynote address was given by Henry Kaestner, co-founder of Sovereign’s Capital, a venture capital firm, and co-founder of Bandwidth.com. In his talk titled “Finding Your Why,” Henry discussed how his search for happiness and success left him hollow and unfulfilled. His search resulted in harmful behavior until he discovered faith. “God taught me a lesson,” says Henry “that I couldn’t find success — couldn’t find happiness — in things of this world.” God changed everything — his marriage, his generosity, and how he ran his business. At Bandwidth he and his partner established four key values:  faith, family, work, and fitness — in that order. With God in his life, Henry told the audience that the hole he had in his life is now filled.

To view Henry’s complete message, see:

 

 

You can view the entire event at The Silicon Valley Prayer Breakfast site.

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